Creative Commons


Creative Commons

  • One alternative to copyright is Creative Commons.
  • Creative Commons was developed by a non-profit organization of the same name.
  • Most works are protected by copyright, which grants specific rights regarding its use.
  • Creative Commons allows for the copyright owner to license his or her work with varying levels of rights.
  • Authors, artists, scientists, and other creators can mark their work with the freedoms they want it to have.
  • For example, a copyright owner can decide to allow the public to copy and distribute the work and create derivative works, as long as the user cites the work properly and doesn't use it for commercial purposes.
  • The way it works is that the copyright owner consults the Creative Commons Web site, http://creativecommons.org and answers questions regarding what level of rights he or she wants to give to others.
  • The copyright owner can insert a hyperlink on his work, which will take the user to the copyright guidelines for that particular work.
  • You can also search Creative Commons for works that authors have agreed can be used for commercial purposes or for works that can be modified or adapted into new creations.

Source:

Hartman, K. and Ackerman, E. (2010). Searching and researching on the Internet and the World Wide Web, Sherwood, OR: Franklin, Beedle & Associates.